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I’m big Anglophile (I’ve been pinching British BBC shows since ’07) and up there among my favorite English celebrities is Stephen Fry, who just happens to be bipolar. He released, recently, his second documentary on the condition called The Not So Secret Life of the Manic Depressive, a 10 yr followup to his first revealing proclamation – The Secret Life of the Manic Depressive.”

Writer, actor, comedian, doer of good works, excellent good friend to the famous and not, Fry lives in his London SW1 flat and his Norfolk house when not traveling. Famous for his public declaration of celibacy in the “Tatler” back in the 1980s, Emma Thompson has characterized her friend as “90 percent gay, 10 percent other.”

On most days, Stephen Fry, is every bit of what most Americans might consider him the zenith of all things British. Amply affable, all too apologetic and with a perfect voice, perfectly erudite and satirical. Perfectly British.

Behind it all, he’s as batshit as you and me – has been all his life, in fact. He’s got bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression, as do around four million other people in this country. In 1995, Fry’s condition became very public when he walked out of a West End play he was in, very nearly killed himself, then disappeared somewhere in Belgium instead. 

THE SECRET LIFE OF THE MANIC DEPRESSIVE

 

THE NOT-SO-SECRET LIFE OF THE MANIC DEPRESSIVE

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